All posts by R A

*Exclusive Interview with Marshal Webb, E.J. Hilbert and Eric Taylor of PATH Network

The ICO world is full of legal ambiguity and many are working hard to game the system, just hoping not to get caught. The team behind PATH Network is different as they are striving to be as compliant as possible. The team is led by an ex-FBI agent who has served as a cybersecurity and governance consultant to numerous firms during his role with Kroll and PWC.  PATH Network will be adding DDOS notification and protection to all clients. 

Learn about Path’s connection to conflict management through their journey:

Q Brav.org
How did you choose your team?

A: On 0-day, or the very 1st day of work at Path, founding members made it clear that Path wouldn’t be just any team. It would be a dream team! That is exactly what Path is now, 6 months after its January 2018 launch, we have brought on a diverse line up of some very talented individuals, including former hackers now turned cybersecurity professionals,  & an ex-FBI agent who used to chase hackers as our CEO, amongst many others.

Q Brav.org:

Why hasn’t somebody come up with this before? Tell the real story, being an insider.

PATH: This project is sophisticated on many levels. Path Network redefines internet intelligence with unparalleled visibility into connectivity by applying blockchain technology to immediately serve a core business need of mid-market internet service providers (ISPs) and cloud service providers (CSPs) as well as internet-powered companies. Path Network’s decentralized approach offers better network insights at a lower cost. This unique paradigm gives Path Network a competitive edge previously unseen in this space, raising quality while reducing overhead.

 

Q Brav.org:  How can PATH get people to volunteer to become node; why will people sign up to do this?

PATH:  The premise of Path Network is simple: use commodity electronics already located around the world to monitor the health of the internet. This is incentivized through the reward of “PATH” tokens to miners that choose to participate by running our software on their devices at home. In return, our customers have their own networks and online services monitored by this array of devices.

 


Q Brav.org Q: How did you decide what technology to use to build this platform…tell the bigger story of how you came to be

PATH: As our motto goes, we plan to redefine internet visibility through blockchain. Path aims to be the world’s first truly decentralized data monitoring network, and will have a first mover and network effect advantage over future companies whom will inevitably see the benefits to blockchain protocol in the network monitoring space.

 

Brav.org Q: How receptive will the users be to this new approach?  

PATH: We have already received a massive amount of complimentary reviews on the project.

The Path team has developed a number of clients to ensure that the Path Network mining application can operate on a multitude of platforms. At the heart of the Path Network agent is a simple core, extended to perform network-related tasks associated with monitoring jobs issued by our customers.  In return, they receive PATH tokens by using our mining application on any given device.

 

Brav.org Q: What is your philosophy on inspiring performance among your team?

 

PATH: Innovation. We will always strive to provide top-grade technology and service to our customers.

 

Brav.org Q: Building all this technology can be intense in the trenches, how do you handle conflict resolution within your development team?

PATH:  We resolve conflict within our development team with ease, thanks to our incredible team chemistry, we simply weigh out  the pros and cons of any given “conflicted situation”, and take time to reflect, then as a team we always find a solution.

 

Brav.org Q: His team is in Australia, China and the US. How do you manage your teams in such a fast paced environment?

PATH: Communication is key at Path, with employees from all around the globe, our time is always managed  in a synchronous matter.

Q Brav.org Q: What kind of impact do you think your product will have on the debate on net neutrality?  

PATH:  As traditional network monitoring remains an industry ripe for disruption, the core of Path Network’s functionality lies in our ability to incorporate the strengths of a centralized platform backed by a decentralized and globally distributed network of monitoring agents.

Q Brav.org Q: In your early days, did you ever pretend that conflict didn’t exist rather than attempt to address the underlying issues?

PATH: In my early days, if there was a conflict, my team and I would always address it, with full transparency until a solution was made. Each lesson learned came with a blessing, as our foundation strengthened, throughout all the hardships and issues we have faced since the very beginning. The firm discipline and team chemistry demonstrated by Path played a significant role in the uprising of Path Network.

 

Faustian Bargains in the Business World: How the cooling of US/Russia Relations has led to a new era of Cloak and Dagger, Bad Deals and Companies Playing Both Sides

Faustian Bargains in the Business World: How the cooling of US/Russia Relations has led to a new era of Cloak and Dagger, Bad Deals and Companies Playing Both SidesBy Dr. Christopher W. Smithmyer 

 

In business, we find that the devil really is in the details.  No where is this more true than in the field of international government contracting.  The old tale of Faust demonstrates how little it actually costs to get something of value to a person if you have something that has currently cost their fancy.  The “deal with the devil” storyline has been played out in countless movies and television shows since the advent of the moving picture.  As the devil fiddles there is now a change to his tune, Russia has begun buying the souls of companies by way of getting them to contract for civilian matters than pressuring them to release data to Moscow.  In the era of the New Cold War, the United State and other allied counties must take steps to control how government contractors with access to privileged information deal with not so friendly second-world countries.

 

If you are a business owner, then you know that government contracts are some of the most lucrative contracts that you can ever pick up.  You get paid well, your employees get paid a prevailing wage and the projects can keep your company secure for years.  For most small business owners (companies with less than 500 employees) this is the ticket to the big time and something that should be cherished.  The reason that people are paid so well for government contracts are because there are strings attached to every check that comes from a national treasury.  How jobs are done, who you can work with and what work you can do outside of the contract are tightly controlled in most cases.  The biggest strings, however, come when you are given a contract that gives you access to privileged or classified data; at this point you become a target of hostile and semi-hostile governments because they want the information that you have.

 

As US/Russia relations cool, the cloak and dagger tactics of the 1950’s-1980’s are seeing a resurgence.  During the golden age of spy-craft, countries attempted to convert government and military officials into “double-agents” for the purpose of spying on their rivals.  In the modern era, we have created a system of laws that prevent this as much as possible by making it difficult for someone in the public spotlight to have any extra-curricular contact with hostile or semi-hostile governments outside of official channels.  As with all things, the industry evolved.  Western free market economies have different definitions of government than the former communist bloc oligarchies.  This means when Intrpolitex states it is “organized by the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia, Federal Security Service, Federal Service for the Forces of the National Guard of the Russian Federation–Russia’s security services that a western democracy sees this as an expo for police equipment, when in all reality the police and the military are highly intertwined in Russia.  This makes it a dangerous platform for companies from allied (NATO) countries to ply their wares.

According to the Interpolitex website, 470 vendors from all around the world are showing off their wares.  Interpolitexstates that there are vendors from ““Belarus, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Israel, China, Latvia, United Arab Emirates, Poland, Korea, France, Czech Republic, USA, South Africa, Japan” which are exhibiting 1500 technologies ranging from civilian to military.  With the media treatment that has been given to Paul Manafort and Hillary Clinton in relation to the dealings in Russia and the Uranium One deal, one can see how companies like Redat, subsidiary of the Czech Company Retia owned by Michal Strnad, who also is a Czech vendor participating at the expo can be seen as a problem.  Companies are lured in by Russia’s claim that the expo is mainly civilian, but as TotalExpo.ru reports “The Exhibition is organized by the Russian Federation Ministry of Internal Affairs, Russian Federal Security Service, Russian Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation and in the capacity of the exhibition operator is Exhibition Companies Group «BIZON».”  Further, they note that Interpolitex is “The Largest in Russian Homeland Security…

 

The way to deal with this problem is simple, yet unpopular- we need to have restrictions on companies to report the same way that the military or government officials on interactions with hostile or semi-hostile governments.  This creates the opportunity for the government to know what nations a company is dealing with, thus know what information that can be shared with them.  Please note, this is only for companies that have privileged or classified information, not your every day import export company or tourism business.  Nations such as the United States, the Czech Republic and others on the above mentioned list need to ensure that access to critical information is protected.

 

If you are a business owner in the modern world, be careful when something looks too good to be true, it generally is.  Just because a nation like Russia is interested in your civilian technologies, that does not mean that they are not bringing you into the deal to acquire information on your military contracts.  Once a nation has access to your computer system, the dividing firewalls within your company tend to crumble quickly to experienced weaponized hackers.  If the soul of your business is that lucrative government contract that you just picked up in an allied country, do not be surprised if Russia comes a calling, playing a beautiful tune of how they are interested in your civilian technologies.  You may just wake up and realize that you sold your soul away.

Brāv & MEND!

Mend: Listen Now & Listen Good

 

 

 

 

#MendAtPunto #PuntoArts #PuntoSpace #Women #Theater #NYC #MothersDay

LET’S CELEBRATE WOMEN’S VOICES. WHILE WE’RE AT IT, LET’S MEND.

Mend: Listen Now & Listen Good is a one-time theater event taking place in celebration on Mother’s Day and artist autonomy on May 13, 5-7pm on PUNTO’s main stage.

A diverse group of multidisciplinary women in the arts, performers, and storytellers will take the stage on topics to include gender, age, culture, motherhood and being a woman.

The evening is sponsored by PUNTO Space, an event and performance raw space located in Midtown West (NYC) founded by theater and performing artists with social good in mind.

Mend: Listen Now & Listen Good is a celebration that amplifies artist autonomy, inclusion in the arts and collaboration.

Light refreshments will be served. Admittance is RSVP-only and complimentary for guests.

 

https://mendatpunto.splashthat.com/

 

Now Accepting Applications: Brāv Internship Opportunities

We are currently seeking interns of all ages to train as Brāv Ones, write short articles, and get the word out about Brāv:
 
Intern Descriptions 
 
​Through egames, Brāv trains anyone in conflict resolution and management. In turn, these trained Brāv Ones aid in the conflicts of others on the site’s face-to-face, Skype-like platforms. We hope to interrupt cycles of violence and deeply rooted conflicts between individuals, groups, organizations, and communities – globally. Brāv intern duties are divided into Communications, Management, Recruitment, and Research, but we are able to customize internships to allow students to choose from any of the different areas of each category. Please see below:
  1. Communications Interns – Have your work published; write 300 – 500 word articles on recent news or popular media pertaining to interesting/innovative topics on egaming, bullying, conflicts, emotions etc – from any angle, including medical, psychology, legal, subjective or objective. Example: http://brav.org/what-rocky-balboa-has-to-do-with-brav/.  
  2. Foster relationships with people affected by mental health, conflicts, emotions, bullying, etc on various social medias, including forums, Google plus threads,psychology threads, forums, etc.
  3. Help Brāv videos go viral (at least 1 million views).
  4. Write press releases, gain attention for Brāv, submit articles and others to media circuits.
  5. Webinar show hosting, whereby students are able to present on innovative topics to an interested public on a topic of their choice so long as it relates to Brāv’s mission. Ie/ “How These Yoga Techniques can help You Instantly Cool Off Before, During or After a Conflict.”
  1. Recruitment Interns – Contact individuals, schools, universities, colleges and organizations to implement and sign up for Brāv.
  2. Increase social media support, ie/ facebook likes and fans, twitter followers, etc.
  3. Promote Brāv through building relationships around various campuses – through both students & faculty – in order to raise awareness about the Brāv movement, print flyers & post around, etc to promote awareness about Brāv.
  4. Seek and contact A list, quality celebrities to endorse Brāv.
  5. Devise contact list of state and national congress members, school administrators and superintendents, CEOs, COOS, organization leaders, etc for calling and marketing Brāv.
  6. Build partnerships with respectable & large organizations.
  1. Management Interns – Manage various Brāv campaigns and fundraisers.
  2. Determine effective ways to get education programs/organizations/work/pageants/sports/etc to sign up for Brāv.
  3. Seek sponsors/donors/grants to contribute funding for conflict resolution and management.
  4. Submit ideas on how Brāv can remain current, effective and efficient. (membership, swag, etc).
  5. Aid in determining Brāv’s best business models ie/ freemium, ads, pricing (lifetime v. year packages), etc.
  6. Aid and help implement a mandate/proclamation to implement Brāv at the state level.
  7. Aid in a realistic budget plan.
  1. Research Interns – Research ‘bullying,’ its current definition, and how Brāv can broaden the current definition.
  2. Research evolution and statistics on online dispute resolution and carry on systematic and ongoing studies of the nature, origins, and types of social conflicts.
  3. Determine which organizations would most effectively benefit from Brāv.
  4. Research current conflict resolution organizations that Brāv can partner with or receive sponsorships, grants and/or endorsements.
  5. Aid in a market analysis of Brāv’s target users.
  6. Gather and interpret data on bullying & conflicts – locally/nationally/internationally.
  7. Gather and interpret data on if/ how Brāv would help those bullied and the aggressors.

Eligibility

To be considered for a Brāv internship, students should meet the following requirements:

  • Currently attend a college, university, or graduate program.
  • Have completed a minimum of one (1) year as a student at a degree-granting two or four-year college or university (completion of one year’s worth of academic credits over a more extended period of time may qualify part-time students for participation in Brāv); or a currently enrolled graduate student or accepted in a graduate degree program
  • Have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0, or equivalent to a C

Professional Skills

  • Good analytical and evaluative skills
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills
  • Good organizational skills, efficiency and flexibility
  • Computer skills, including familiarity with Microsoft products (MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint), email software, internet searching, and other programs
Applicants may come from any academic discipline.  
Internship acceptances are on a rolling basis and students work from a distance. Those interested can submit a short statement explaining their interest in Brāv, an internship proposal request (essentially stating which duties they are particularly interested in), and a resume to info@brav.org
Thank you.
We spoke to CEO Steve of Badger Maps about his thoughts on conflict management in his field.

Steven Benson is the Founder and CEO of Badger Maps, the #1 route planner for field salespeople. After receiving his MBA from Stanford, Steve’s career has been in field sales with companies like IBM, Autonomy, and Google – becoming Google Enterprise’s Top Performing Salesperson in the World in 2009. In 2012 Steve founded Badger Maps to help field salespeople be more successful. He has also been selected as one of the Top 40 Most Inspiring Leaders in Sales Lead Management.

What is your day-to-day like?

My day-to-day activities usually involve meetings with my teams, calls or video chats with team members from our other offices in SLC and Spain, and focused time where I can work with no distractions.There are always a ton of things coming up every day and we have lots of projects going on at Badger. To stay on top of everything, I focus on getting the important things done – even when they’re not urgent. Unfortunately, there are also ‘urgent but not important’ things and ‘important and urgent’ things that constantly pop up

The way I carve off time to focus on getting the important things done is by working late at night when there aren’t any distractions. The other thing that has worked just as well for me is waking up early and working. In either case, the key is that the phone doesn’t ring, there are no meetings, and no one is grabbing me to take care of things that are urgent.

I also write down every night the most important things I want to do the next day, and then try to do those things before anything else. I like to put this as a recurring calendar entry because then anything I don’t do in a day can automatically roll over to the next day, and it blocks off a period of time for me to focus on those important things. There are a bunch of productivity apps that are great for this, too.

For me, it’s important to have half my day unscheduled. So many things come up that if I didn’t have unblocked time throughout the day, I wouldn’t be able to jump into the things that are really important to keeping the team moving efficiently.

What were your big challenges?

There have been a lot of challenges when starting and growing Badger Maps, but the toughest one was to build a great team. You need a team of great people to do great things, but it’s hard to hire people who have the expertise that you need to build a company. I’m sure this is more true in some industries than others, and it’s certainly true in our industry – software.

The challenges to building a great team starts with finding great co-founders. Bringing in great people, who are the right fit, with the right skills onto the team early on when you face insurmountable odds is one of the toughest parts of launching a business. After you lock in the core team, making your first few hires are critical in terms of shaping the culture and getting your future leaders in place. It takes way longer and it’s way harder to do well then I ever realized before I set out to do it.

Another challenge for me was, and still is, building a great culture and providing the best communication platforms while having a mobile workforce. It’s hard to create a sense of community with a dispersed workforce because people need to socialize in person to build trust and relationships. At Badger, we have offices across 3 continents but we do our best to have a cohesive culture.

How did you address them?

To foster a great culture and community at Badger, we have employees from different offices visit and work out of the other offices for extended periods of time. We are for example sending people from our Headquarters in San Francisco to our main office in Europe, in Spain for 1 to 3 months.

We encourage constant communication between the employees with tools like Slack and Google Hangouts but it’s still a challenge to constantly keep everyone involved and updated.

We also have a Foosball table in our office since it’s a great team building activity. We’ve found that when a team has a sport or an activity in common it’s invaluable and fosters a great and inclusive culture. It helps everyone get to know each other, deepens relationships, and gives people a way to blow off steam together. Foosball is a simple but surprisingly fun game, and anyone can play it as it cuts across gender, culture, and natural physical ability.

A team building event playing a popular sport like basketball has an uneven playing field. Even if one person is great at Foosball, and the other person has hardly played, it’s still fun, and the teams can be balanced in two on two pretty easily. The positive impact on team culture to have something that anyone can do together is hard to beat! All of the Badger offices have a Foosball table that people enjoy playing – often in a highly competitive manner. When people go to different offices, they all have this shared hobby in common.

What are some clear results since solving the problem?

We were able to create a different kind of culture at Badger that is more supportive and team oriented than a lot of Silicon Valley cultures. I hope and believe that we are creating a company with an environment where all types of people can thrive in and develop successful and fulfilling careers.

What do you see as exciting opportunities in the future?

 

I’m most excited about the opportunity to coach, lead, mentor and further grow my team at Badger. I’m having a ton of fun helping people be their best in their career, and there has been so much personal and professional growth at the company over the last few years. We have taught people how to do better at their job. But more important, we’ve worked to find the right fit for people in the organization and launched their careers in a way they will never forget. I’m looking forward to coaching even more in the future and growing the teams across our different offices.

What advice do you have for others in your shoes?

My advice is to build a culture and business that people are really excited to work at. It’s important to create an environment where everybody feels welcomed and appreciated, and is happy with their position and career development. Providing a great workplace will help you avoid internal conflicts and miscommunications, overcome challenges with recruiting and hiring and increase employee retention.

Culture is an important concept because it makes or breaks the success of an organization. It can make a company great to work for or it can make it a chore to show up for work. Culture is hard to put your finger on, but if all the people who work at a company seem to have something in common, function as one unit, and seem to all be on the same team, then they probably have a strong culture.

You can try to gloss over a crappy work environment with higher pay and perks, but ultimately, people leave their jobs because their manager is bad or because the company has a crappy culture that sucks the life out of them. But it’s hard to fake, you have to have an authentic, genuinely awesome place to work to attract and retain top talent, and grow your business.