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Join us April 7-13th on our Brāv Continuing Education and Networking Cruise!

Brāv International Networking and
Continuing Education Cruise

*A deposit of $250 per person due September 23, 2018; if going solo, must pay double*

When: April 7 th 2019- April 13 th , 2019
Where: We will leave from beautiful Ft. Lauderdale
Florida, travel to Georgetown, Grand Cayman, then Puerto
Costa Maya, Mexico, followed by Cozumel, Mexico before
returning to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.
Why?: Because the Brāv International Networking and
Continuing Education Cruise is your opportunity to meet
your continuing education requirements and have the
opportunity to network with Conflict Management
Professionals from across the country.

Costs and Requirements
The costs of the trip are listed per person based on dual
occupancy.

All room categories are on a first come first
serve basis.

*Must have valid, current passport*

JOIN US HERE!

Drinking Packages are available on the ship.
The prices include the cruise, port fees, and taxes. They
also include the training package listed within the
description. Meals in the main dining room and at the
buffets are covered, as well as some meals at select
included restaurants on board. This price does not include
premium drinks, airfare, transfers or shore excursions. The
price also does not include travel insurance which is Highly
Recommended. 3

1 Passengers traveling alone and/or who would like three people in a room should contact the travel agent,
Weekend Wanderers, directly at 1 (814) 674-8918 to make arrangements.
2 Companion tickets can be purchased for persons who are traveling with a person taking the training but
do not wish to take the training themselves. They are priced at (SB) $950; (OVB) $850; (OV) $800; and (I)
$750. Priority for rooms is given to rooms where both parties are taking the training.
3 For Travel Insrance please contact Weekend Wanderers at 1 (814) 674-8918 or at
WeekendWanderers@Aol.com.

Training Packages
All Travelers (2)
 Introduction to Conflict Management (S)- This course is a primer to those who
are new to the field of Conflict Management or those who are veteran conflict
managers who wish to see what is new.
 Brāv International Events (C)- This course is a description of courses which are
offered by Brāv internationally, including our trips to Australia and Isreal/Europe.

Bronze Level Travelers (5)
 Online Conflict Management (C)- This course explains the growing field of
online conflict managements and how you can use OCM to grow your business.
 Using the Brāv Platform (A)- This course is a training on how to use the Brāv
platform in your business and how it can make your OCM practice more efficient.
 Becoming a Brāv One (A)- This course explains how you can join the Brāv OCM
family, even if you are not intending to be a mediator.

Silver Level Travelers (9)
 Cultural Awareness in Mediation (S)- This course goes through the process of
being culturally sensitive in culturally diverse mediation situations.
 International Mediation Process (C)- This course explains the intricacies of
international mediation for those who are entering into the field.
 Ethics in Mediation (S)- This course highlights the importance of ethics in the
field of conflict management, looking at the situations and solutions that arise
from conflict in the world.
 International Domestic Violence (A)- This course discusses how to deal with
domestic violence in situations where people are being abused by loved ones.

Brāv Level Travelers (13)
 The Mexico Trade Agreement (C)- This course looks at the new US/Mexico
Trade Agreement and possible conflicts arising from it.
 Human Rights In the Modern Era (S)- This course looks at how human rights can
be protected by OCM
 Addressing The Divisive Mind (S)- Mr. Zamor’s masterclass in how the mind works in
conflict.
 Current Event Class (C)- A class on an event between now and the cruise 4
Each Category includes the classes above. 5
4 Classes are subject to change and replacement by a class of equal or lesser value.
5 (S) Stanley Zamor, (A) Dr. Alli, (C) Dr. Christopher W. Smithmyer
To peruse and pay, please CLICK HERE!

For Questions please contact info@Brav.org.

Rooms come with two beds*

Actual room may differ from picture*

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Six Reasons To Choose Mediation To Resolve Your Dispute On Separation.

There are a number reasons why people turn to mediation to  resolve disputes.

Mediation is a way of reaching resolution of a problem with the minimum of confrontation and hostility and without the ill feeling and hurt that can often follow a court case which, by its very nature, will result in a winner and a loser.

Mediation helps parties to come to an agreement in a neutral setting.

Civil and commercial mediation generally begins with all parties in the same room and, because communication is direct rather than through solicitors’ letters, this encourages understanding and cooperation. Smaller sessions may also be appropriate. Family mediation begins with individual sessions but soon moves on to joint meetings where issues can be explored and solutions identified.

Mediation discourages confrontation and promotes cooperation by focusing on the shared nature of the problem, rather than the entrenched positions into which parties may have settled. This can be absolutely vital if there will be an enduring relationship between the parties after the dispute at hand has been resolved – for example, in family and neighbourhood disputes or those between employee and employer or student and school.

Below are six reasons to choose mediation to resolve your dispute on separation.

1. Cost
Mediation costs a fraction of the amount of a court case. In civil mediation the costs are agreed in advance by all parties and are based on the estimated length of the mediation session and whether facilities are to be provided. These costs are split between the participants, generally half each. Family mediation is a little less predictable, but generally speaking all the issues have been resolved within 5 or 6 sessions, often fewer.

2. Speed
Everyone who is familiar with the courts or reads the newspapers regularly will know that legal cases take an incredible amount of time to come to trial. Mediation is arranged at the mutual convenience of participants and is invariably much quicker.

3. Time
The wait for a court date is a long one. The courts are extremely busy and it can be months between hearings. Your lives are left on hold pending a further court date. In addition, in a children case, if you need a CAFCASS report http://www.cafcass.gov.uk/ they can take 16+ weeks. Reports from other experts can take as long, if not longer.

4.Court proceedings are stressful. The nature of the process is adversarial. Correspondence is frequent, there is much documentation. Few relish the prospect of being cross-examined by experienced counsel.
Perhaps the final benefit of mediation is its cost in comparison to litigation. Legal action is very expensive and the higher in the legal process the case proceeds, the bigger the bill.

5.Control over the situation

You decide the issues you want to talk about and the priority. You are able to make offers and suggest proposals for agreement which are without prejudice – if the mediation fails, the Judge won’t know the concessions you were prepared to make to reach an agreement in mediation. You can take a break if the mediation gets too much and step out of the meeting. You decide how many meetings you need to have, and when. Ultimately, an agreement reached is one decided by you, with the concessions you are prepared to make.

With Court, the Judge, who doesn’t know you, your children, your ex – decides the future for your family.

6, Less confrontational
The mediation process tends to be less confrontational and less antagonistic than the alternatives. That is the best to resort to solve dipute matters with dignity.

Contact Brav,for further details. We’re here to help you out.

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#Infographic – Indicators of Effective #Mediation

Mediation is often assessed in terms of single factor only: whether involved parties reached settlement or not, irrespective of the way in which it was steered or the quality of the outcome. While effectiveness of outcome is obviously important, there is wider range of indicators of a competent and effective mediation.

 

 

Feature Image Source: here

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Attributes of a Good Mediator

There is no formula for figuring out who the “best” mediators are – there is no governing body that determines minimal qualifications for a professional mediator. Even if there were, education and training don’t guarantee competence, because a “good” mediator also possesses certain internal attributes that aren’t necessarily learned in a classroom. They just simply can’t be learned in a classroom. They are internal traits which are either inherent or learnt from one’s own environment.
This article lists external and internal attributes that the most effective mediators possess.

External attributes

Mediators in the United States are not required to meet a uniform standard of education or training for beginning to practice mediation; each state has its own requirements, or, in many cases, none at all. It depends from situation to situation and place to place.
For this reason, it can be difficult to evaluate the qualifications of a potential mediator. We recommend paying particular attention to the following external attributes of mediators you are considering to hire:

Training/Education

How much training has the mediator received?

Was any of the training specific to a certain area of practice (e.g., family, landlord/tenant)?

How recently was the mediator trained? Do they attend refresher courses and keep up on current mediation techniques?

Where was the training conducted?

Does the mediator have a degree in dispute resolution or a related field? If so, from where (e.g. online, law school, university)?

These questions do held relevance, even though just a degree is not enough to know the competence of a mediator.

Certified or certificated? (If required in your state)

Is the mediator actually certified or certificated?

What organization issued the certificate?

What are the requirements of that certificate?

When was the certificate earned?

This will let you know the ‘value’ of you mediator, and will give you a fair abour his or her skills.

Experience

For how long has this mediator been in practice? Full-time or part-time?

How many mediations has this mediator conducted, and how many were similar to yours?

Does this mediator specialize in the area of your particular dispute?

This one is important. More the experience, more the tact. Experienced mediators often have higher success rates than the ones who are not that experienced.

Professional memberships

Does this mediator belong to an organization requiring adherence to certain standards?

Does this mediator serve on the board of any relevant organizations?

This again gives an idea about the standing and influence of a mediator.

Philosophy and approach

What philosophy does this mediator apply to their work? Do they describe their work as facilitative, transformative, and/or evaluative? Take note of how the mediator describes their process, then consider what that would look like when applied to your case.

What kind of interaction with disputants does the mediator like to have?

Fees

Are fees charged by the session, by the hour, by the case?

What is included in these fees?

This one is also  important and should be decided beforehand so there are no disputes about it afterwards.

Internal attributes

What about the things that can’t be listed on a profile page? There are five ways to know about the competency skills which cannot be presented on the paper:

Investigative

Effective mediators are able to quickly identify relevant information. They ask questions to gain an understanding of both the facts of the case and of parties’ underlying interests and motivations. This investigation helps them in understanding and resolving the case.

Empathetic

Mediators should handle the knowledge of parties’ underlying interests with empathy and consideration. They are willing to ask emotionally difficult questions and do so in an unbiased and respectful manner. A non empathic mediator has lower success rates.

Inventive and problem-solving

Effective mediators help disputants discover common ground and guide them toward mutual understanding from there; they are willing to be inventive with unusual situations. This will help you reach faster to a resolution.

Effective presenter

Verbal expressions, gestures, and eye contact are consistently and effectively used by good mediators to structure an environment in which disputants are willing to re-examine their positions. They maintain a safe and relatively calm atmosphere with confidence and communicative body language.

Capably manages interactions

Mediators should keep the parties on track and working toward the issues they have identified as central to their conflict, and call for breaks or private caucuses when needed. A good mediator knows when allowing tension to rise will be productive and when to effectively defuse tension. These tactics must demonstrate sensitivity to the disputants’ needs (e.g., emotional, cultural) and remain neutral.

After the mediation

After you select your mediator – and hopefully, settle your case – it’s time to help others consider this mediator for their own cases. A testimonial and/or recommendation of your mediator provides vital information for other people in conflict, particularly about the mediator’s internal attributes that can’t be seen on a profile page.
Additionally, a testimonial helps to spread the word that mediation is a quick, confidential, and cost-effective way to settle disputes out of court. A mediator should be selected very carefully and in no haste.