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Now Accepting Applications: Brāv Internship Opportunities

We are currently seeking interns of all ages to train as Brāv Ones, write short articles, and get the word out about Brāv:
 
Intern Descriptions 
 
Through egames, Brāv trains anyone in conflict resolution and management. In turn, these trained Brāv Ones aid in the conflicts of others on the site’s face-to-face, Skype-like platforms. We hope to interrupt cycles of violence and deeply rooted conflicts between individuals, groups, organizations, and communities – globally. Brāv intern duties are divided into Communications, Management, Recruitment, and Research, but we are able to customize internships to allow students to choose from any of the different areas of each category. Please see below:
  1. Software Development Interns – Test your skills through real life work!
  2. Assist with building and deploying support to internal clients through instant messages, phone and other interactions
  3. Collaborate with engineers, developers, architects, quality assurance, system engineers and product managers to solve new and existing technical issues
  4. Understand requirements, implement designs, provide administration tools and documentation for specific projects
  5. Develop and maintain software to support business functions
  6. Participate in design and code reviews
  7. Follow and enhance existing development processes
  8. Measure and verify that codes have acceptable performance and scalability.
  1. Product Management Interns 
  2. Assist product managers in “Product Development” tasks to properly scope the opportunity for Brāv
  3. Use collaboration skills to bring technical leaders together to formulate a clear statement of work (SOW) to understand the requirements being asked of each functional team
  4. Exposure through participating in customer negotiations for future business awards
  5. Collect market research on market trends for automotive technology and present findings
  6. Craft product marketing material to effectively promote Brāv product offerings.
  1. Communications Interns – Have your work published; write 300 – 500 word articles on recent news or popular media pertaining to interesting/innovative topics on egaming, bullying, conflicts, emotions etc – from any angle, including medical, psychology, legal, subjective or objective. Example: http://brav.org/what-rocky-balboa-has-to-do-with-brav/.  
  2. Foster relationships with people affected by mental health, conflicts, emotions, bullying, etc on various social medias, including forums, Google plus threads,psychology threads, forums, etc.
  3. Help Brāv videos go viral (at least 1 million views).
  4. Write press releases, gain attention for Brāv, submit articles and others to media circuits.
  5. Webinar show hosting, whereby students are able to present on innovative topics to an interested public on a topic of their choice so long as it relates to Brāv’s mission. Ie/ “How These Yoga Techniques can help You Instantly Cool Off Before, During or After a Conflict.”
  1. Recruitment Interns – Contact individuals, schools, universities, colleges and organizations to implement and sign up for Brāv.
  2. Increase social media support, ie/ facebook likes and fans, twitter followers, etc.
  3. Promote Brāv through building relationships around various campuses – through both students & faculty – in order to raise awareness about the Brāv movement, print flyers & post around, etc to promote awareness about Brāv.
  4. Seek and contact A list, quality celebrities to endorse Brāv.
  5. Devise contact list of state and national congress members, school administrators and superintendents, CEOs, COOS, organization leaders, etc for calling and marketing Brāv.
  6. Build partnerships with respectable & large organizations.
  1. Management Interns – Manage various Brāv campaigns and fundraisers.
  2. Determine effective ways to get education programs/organizations/work/pageants/sports/etc to sign up for Brāv.
  3. Seek sponsors/donors/grants to contribute funding for conflict resolution and management.
  4. Submit ideas on how Brāv can remain current, effective and efficient. (membership, swag, etc).
  5. Aid in determining Brāv’s best business models ie/ freemium, ads, pricing (lifetime v. year packages), etc.
  6. Aid and help implement a mandate/proclamation to implement Brāv at the state level.
  7. Aid in a realistic budget plan.
  1. Research Interns – Research ‘bullying,’ its current definition, and how Brāv can broaden the current definition.
  2. Research evolution and statistics on online dispute resolution and carry on systematic and ongoing studies of the nature, origins, and types of social conflicts.
  3. Determine which organizations would most effectively benefit from Brāv.
  4. Research current conflict resolution organizations that Brāv can partner with or receive sponsorships, grants and/or endorsements.
  5. Aid in a market analysis of Brāv’s target users.
  6. Gather and interpret data on bullying & conflicts – locally/nationally/internationally.
  7. Gather and interpret data on if/ how Brāv would help those bullied and the aggressors.

Eligibility

To be considered for a Brāv internship, students should meet the following requirements:

  • Currently attend a college, university, or graduate program.
  • Have completed a minimum of one (1) year as a student at a degree-granting two or four-year college or university (completion of one year’s worth of academic credits over a more extended period of time may qualify part-time students for participation in Brāv); or a currently enrolled graduate student or accepted in a graduate degree program
  • Have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0, or equivalent to a C

Professional Skills

  • Good analytical and evaluative skills
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills
  • Good organizational skills, efficiency and flexibility
  • Computer skills, including familiarity with Microsoft products (MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint), email software, internet searching, and other programs
Applicants may come from any academic discipline.  
Internship acceptances are on a rolling basis and students work from a distance. Those interested can submit a short statement explaining their interest in Brāv, an internship proposal request (essentially stating which duties they are particularly interested in), and a resume to info@brav.org
Thank you.
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We spoke to CEO Steve of Badger Maps about his thoughts on conflict management in his field.

Steven Benson is the Founder and CEO of Badger Maps, the #1 route planner for field salespeople. After receiving his MBA from Stanford, Steve’s career has been in field sales with companies like IBM, Autonomy, and Google – becoming Google Enterprise’s Top Performing Salesperson in the World in 2009. In 2012 Steve founded Badger Maps to help field salespeople be more successful. He has also been selected as one of the Top 40 Most Inspiring Leaders in Sales Lead Management.

What is your day-to-day like?

My day-to-day activities usually involve meetings with my teams, calls or video chats with team members from our other offices in SLC and Spain, and focused time where I can work with no distractions.There are always a ton of things coming up every day and we have lots of projects going on at Badger. To stay on top of everything, I focus on getting the important things done – even when they’re not urgent. Unfortunately, there are also ‘urgent but not important’ things and ‘important and urgent’ things that constantly pop up

The way I carve off time to focus on getting the important things done is by working late at night when there aren’t any distractions. The other thing that has worked just as well for me is waking up early and working. In either case, the key is that the phone doesn’t ring, there are no meetings, and no one is grabbing me to take care of things that are urgent.

I also write down every night the most important things I want to do the next day, and then try to do those things before anything else. I like to put this as a recurring calendar entry because then anything I don’t do in a day can automatically roll over to the next day, and it blocks off a period of time for me to focus on those important things. There are a bunch of productivity apps that are great for this, too.

For me, it’s important to have half my day unscheduled. So many things come up that if I didn’t have unblocked time throughout the day, I wouldn’t be able to jump into the things that are really important to keeping the team moving efficiently.

What were your big challenges?

There have been a lot of challenges when starting and growing Badger Maps, but the toughest one was to build a great team. You need a team of great people to do great things, but it’s hard to hire people who have the expertise that you need to build a company. I’m sure this is more true in some industries than others, and it’s certainly true in our industry – software.

The challenges to building a great team starts with finding great co-founders. Bringing in great people, who are the right fit, with the right skills onto the team early on when you face insurmountable odds is one of the toughest parts of launching a business. After you lock in the core team, making your first few hires are critical in terms of shaping the culture and getting your future leaders in place. It takes way longer and it’s way harder to do well then I ever realized before I set out to do it.

Another challenge for me was, and still is, building a great culture and providing the best communication platforms while having a mobile workforce. It’s hard to create a sense of community with a dispersed workforce because people need to socialize in person to build trust and relationships. At Badger, we have offices across 3 continents but we do our best to have a cohesive culture.

How did you address them?

To foster a great culture and community at Badger, we have employees from different offices visit and work out of the other offices for extended periods of time. We are for example sending people from our Headquarters in San Francisco to our main office in Europe, in Spain for 1 to 3 months.

We encourage constant communication between the employees with tools like Slack and Google Hangouts but it’s still a challenge to constantly keep everyone involved and updated.

We also have a Foosball table in our office since it’s a great team building activity. We’ve found that when a team has a sport or an activity in common it’s invaluable and fosters a great and inclusive culture. It helps everyone get to know each other, deepens relationships, and gives people a way to blow off steam together. Foosball is a simple but surprisingly fun game, and anyone can play it as it cuts across gender, culture, and natural physical ability.

A team building event playing a popular sport like basketball has an uneven playing field. Even if one person is great at Foosball, and the other person has hardly played, it’s still fun, and the teams can be balanced in two on two pretty easily. The positive impact on team culture to have something that anyone can do together is hard to beat! All of the Badger offices have a Foosball table that people enjoy playing – often in a highly competitive manner. When people go to different offices, they all have this shared hobby in common.

What are some clear results since solving the problem?

We were able to create a different kind of culture at Badger that is more supportive and team oriented than a lot of Silicon Valley cultures. I hope and believe that we are creating a company with an environment where all types of people can thrive in and develop successful and fulfilling careers.

What do you see as exciting opportunities in the future?

 

I’m most excited about the opportunity to coach, lead, mentor and further grow my team at Badger. I’m having a ton of fun helping people be their best in their career, and there has been so much personal and professional growth at the company over the last few years. We have taught people how to do better at their job. But more important, we’ve worked to find the right fit for people in the organization and launched their careers in a way they will never forget. I’m looking forward to coaching even more in the future and growing the teams across our different offices.

What advice do you have for others in your shoes?

My advice is to build a culture and business that people are really excited to work at. It’s important to create an environment where everybody feels welcomed and appreciated, and is happy with their position and career development. Providing a great workplace will help you avoid internal conflicts and miscommunications, overcome challenges with recruiting and hiring and increase employee retention.

Culture is an important concept because it makes or breaks the success of an organization. It can make a company great to work for or it can make it a chore to show up for work. Culture is hard to put your finger on, but if all the people who work at a company seem to have something in common, function as one unit, and seem to all be on the same team, then they probably have a strong culture.

You can try to gloss over a crappy work environment with higher pay and perks, but ultimately, people leave their jobs because their manager is bad or because the company has a crappy culture that sucks the life out of them. But it’s hard to fake, you have to have an authentic, genuinely awesome place to work to attract and retain top talent, and grow your business.

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Mediation/Arbitration: An Alternative to Litigation: “Workplace Sexual Harassment, #MeToo & Finding A Resolution Process”

#METOO Trends and Highlights

Cyber Bullying Abusement Harassment Trolling

IN the past few months social media and every industry has been a flooded with allegations of sexual harassment. The silence has been broken, and the once considered “too powerful” and untouchable are being “handled” and striped of their positions/power. Sexual harassment is not industry specific, it is not new and the skeletons in the Walmart-size closets are busting out. Here are some statistics from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and news polls:

  • 75% of all workplace harassment goes unreported.
  • 30% of individuals who were harassed spoke immediately to their supervisor, unionrepresentative, managers or the Human Resource department.
  • “…sexual harassment training is easily mocked – and often brushed off…”
  • According to the Washington Post “between 1997 and 2014 the US Treasury” paid 235awards and settlements worth approximately $15.2 million for workplace violations on Capitol Hill.No industry is safe from sexual predatory behavior. And the behavior has been allowed to permeate the business/entertainment/ culture. Even the EEOC states that yearly training is not enough and is usually only focused on avoiding legal liability. After doing many EEOC mediations which lead to reviewing thousands of employment manual pages, state and federal rules, regulations, and policies, I am comfortable to say that there remains to be A LOT of work done if we wish to change the sexual harassment culture.Finding a Resolution Process

    We know that victims are ignored and paid off; and litigation and hefty settlements have not prevented predatory behavior. So what is the answer, and what should be considered when seeking arbitration and mediation as alternatives? Honesty, I am not sure, but I am confident that the Victim-shaming, fear, and the industry-cultural norms that allowed sexual harassment to go unchecked and underreported need deeper and broader systemic solutions.

    The following are brief points when considering other resolution options:

    Arbitration, Akin to Litigation –

  • Engaged as per employment contract provision(s), due process paranoia is a challenge.
  • Awards are usually confidential.
  • Victims often relive the incident like at a trial.
  • No appeals process.Mediation – Pros & Cons (limited and not exhaustive)
    • Pro- Empowerment- Many victims want an opportunity to face their abuser and ask “Why?”
    • Pro: Confidentiality- Victims are often ashamed and do not want, to have to relive the event multiple times.
    • Pro: Time – Much faster than litigation and arbitration.
    • Con: Confidentiality – Mediation and the possible agreement, are confidential. Theabuser often gets a chance to silence the incident/victim and is not truly held accountable.
    • Con: To Settle – Should a victim compromise and settle with the abuser?Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court Certified Circuit/Family/County Mediator & Primary Trainer and Qualified Arbitrator. Mr. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/arbitration rosters and has a private mediation and ADR consulting company. He regularly lectures on a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and Family/Business relationships.
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Have your Conflicts Managed with Albert Square Mediation!

Albert Square Mediation

Albert Square Mediation Limited (ASM) is one of the many joining us to provide online conflict management here at Brāv. ASM provides a unique range of high quality, cost-effective and time-saving services and their experts work on the basis that no problem is too big or too small have considerable experience of dispute resolution.

Services include:

 

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